Marketing Curriculum

LOWER DIVISION MARKETING REQUIREMENTS

Offered every fall and spring

The course examines the functions, objectives, organization and structure of business in a market economy and in a global context, including relationships among business, government, and the consumer. Course modules include business organization and management; pricing and distribution; human resources; accounting; financial management and investment; and the nature, causes and implications of international trade and multi-national business organizations.

Offered every fall and spring

Prerequisite: ENG 112 /112H

Students learn to prepare effective written, verbal and digital presentations for a variety of business situations, including professional emails, memos, letters, individual and group oral and digital presentations, management briefs and reports. Attention is given to proficiency in the conventions of Standard Written English, well developed and well supported presentations, and strong delivery skills.

Offered every fall and spring

This course critically analyses the essential role of ethics in the American-Global business community. Topics for analysis include: the current ethical conditions in the business community; defining business; defining ethics; the necessary connection between business and ethics; the purpose/s of work; fair profits and wages; capitalism and its critics; global business practices; power and justice; corporate and employee responsibilities; business, sustainability, and the environment; ethics and global business relations.

Offered every fall and spring

This course focuses on practical skills such as writing resumes and cover letters, utilizing professional online networking resources, assessing career interests and researching internship opportunities.

CS 280 – Introduction to Data Analysis

Offered every fall and spring

Students use and manipulate data sets needed for analysis and presentation. Students will build and edit detailed electronic spreadsheets containing advanced features and functions such as financial formulas, pivot tables and charts, scenarios and data filters. Some statistical concepts and their applications within MS Excel are introduced. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate proficiency in Excel through Microsoft Office Specialist certification examination. $45 lab fee required.

Or

CS 280H – Introduction to Data Analysis-Honors

Prerequisite: Invitation into Honors program or MCU cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher.

Students use and manipulate data sets needed for analysis and presentation. Students will build and edit detailed electronic spreadsheets containing advanced features and functions such as financial formulas, pivot tables and charts, scenarios and data filters. Some statistical concepts and their applications within MS Excel are introduced.  Honors course will introduce advanced data analysis topics including: “big data,” data mining, and data visualization tools, such as Tableau and Power BI.  Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate proficiency through Microsoft Office Specialist certification exam.  $45 lab fee required.

Offered every fall and spring

Essential principles of economic analysis from the viewpoint of choices to be made by individual economic units. Scarcity; supply, demand and elasticity; opportunity costs; cost theory; price and output determination under various market structures and factor markets; government regulation; comparative advantage; international trade. Application of economic theory to current economic problems

Offered every fall and spring

Survey of various fields within the discipline of psychology, such as perception, memory and personality, and how each of these fields contributes to understanding and improving human behavior

Offered every fall and spring

An introductory course in probability and statistics. It includes calculation and analysis of statistical parameters with statistical software for personal computers. Topics include sampling, measures of central tendency and variability, probability distribution, normal and binomial distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing. Application of a variety of statistical tests, including the sign test, z-test, t-test, chi-square analysis of variance, linear regression and correlation, and non-parametric tests. Comparable to PSY 235. Credit will not be given for both courses.

UPPER DIVISION MARKETING REQUIREMENTS

Offered every fall and spring

A survey course that explores the art and science of organizational management, the class will examine classic theories, modern theories and applications. Students will learn to assess management activities as they apply to ethics, multiculturalism, social responsibility, and group dynamics. The class will introduce the concepts of scalable management principles as applied to small companies or multi-national corporations and will include techniques to evaluate the organization’s environment and plan appropriate structures, processes and controls.

Offered every fall and spring

Prerequisite: BUS 110.

A foundation course in marketing theory and applications. Topics covered will include consumer research, product development, positioning, branding, market segmentation, pricing, communication, promotion, and distribution, with emphasis on the firm’s own planning and strategic context.

Offered spring 2021, 2023

Prerequisite: BUS 300 and BUS 350 and MTH 270.

Applications of quantitative techniques, qualitative analyses, and software modeling for the optimization of marketing decision-making and market predictions. Students will learn empirical applications of market data analysis, pricing optimization, market forecasting, channel optimization, segmentation, perceptual mapping, return on promotion, OLAP, and market response models.

Offered Spring 2021, 2023

BUS 454 – New Product Development (4 units)

Offered Spring 2021, 2022, 2024

Prerequisite: BUS 350.

This course will use readings, case analysis and projects to examine the processes, tools, and best practices used in developing new products and services. Topics include concept identification, market feasibility, technical feasibility, financial feasibility, new product adoption, and life-cycle management.

or

BUS 456 – Integrated Marketing Communications

Offered Spring 2020, 2023

Prerequisite: BUS 230.

An overview of the components and tactics involved in creating an integrated marketing communications strategy. This course is designed for students who will become decision makers in profit or non-profit organizations which engage in advertising, public relations, promotions, Internet marketing, point-of-purchase materials, media and client communications. Special attention will be placed on effectiveness and measurable results, and the role communication plays in the marketing environment.

Offered every fall and spring

Prerequisite: Senior standing, BUS 300 and Math 270.

This course focuses on studying the practice of competitive strategy from the manager’s perspective. During this course, students will develop the skills to apply classic and modern tools for strategic analysis, planning and execution. Students will learn techniques for conducting quantitative business analytics, evaluating economic value/cost structures, and decision-making techniques and assess their relevance to a firm’s competitive advantage. In addition, students will enhance business communication and presentation skills.

Internship

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor of Record and completion of Internship Application. A supervised off-campus practical experience in a community, company or institutional setting. Application of core concepts in an academic field with an On-Site Supervisor and an MCU Instructor of Record.

or

Practicum

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor of Record and completion of Practicum Application. Student participates in an MCU on-campus experience with a Marymount faculty member, department or office. Focus of the practicum is related to Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) developed by the student and the Instructor of Record.

Offered every spring

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

In this course students learn how to use social media for marketing with a global perspective. Through examining case studies and interactive class exercises students learn best practices and technical skills in order to connect business objectives with social media strategies, platforms and tactics.

MARKETING ELECTIVES

Choose 3 electives from 2 different categories

BUS 312 – The Fundamentals of Sales (4 units)
This course will introduce students to the principles and practices of sales and selling. It will focus on the history of sales, the value created by sales, and the methodologies necessary to succeed in sales and selling. Also addressed will be the interdependence of marketing and sales, the importance of customer relationships, and the role of modern technology in the selling process. The course will be applicable to anyone who will be utilizing sales techniques and skills in their lives and careers.

CAR 145 – Communication Structures (4 units)
An examination of the structures underlying both verbal and visual modes of communication in modern society. Emphasis is placed on a study of comparable features in the various media used in the art of expression. Contemporary media will be investigated against a background of standard patterns of communication. Written, oral, and digital communication skills will also be developed through a series of written research projects and recorded and/or live presentations

PSY 222 – Psychology of Gender (4 units)
This course examines the biological and social context in which women and men express gendered behaviors. Research and scholarship provide the material for a critical review and an overall picture of gender from a psychological perspective, while emphasizing cross-cultural and diversity perspectives of gender.

PSY 280 – Intercultural Psychology (4 units)
Prerequisite: PSY 150.
This course introduces theories, concepts and research methods employed in studying behavior in the intercultural context, variables influencing human interaction, and basic knowledge concerning cultural issues. This course facilitates students’ development of observational and analytical skills regarding intercultural interaction.

PSY 345 – Social Psychology (4 units)
Prerequisites: Completion of PSY 150 or SOC 100 or consent of instructor.
Recommended course: PSY 240.
Concerned with understanding how an individual’s behavior, thoughts and feelings are affected or influenced by the presence, characteristics and actions of other people. Focuses on social interaction – describing, understanding and explaining interpersonal behavior.

 

AM 151 – Digital Photography I (4 units)
Class hours: 2 lecture, 2 laboratory
Beginning photography course introduces students to creative use of DSLR & HDSLR cameras. Basic photographic vocabulary, history and styles are covered. Course emphasizes creative photography using manual camera settings, exposure, various lenses and accessories. Effective use of lighting is covered for studio, interior, exterior and natural settings. Students explore photographic genre and styles including: portrait, landscape, still life, commercial and fine art photography. Use of various photographic methods, use of digital printers and printing papers will be incorporated. $50 technology fee required.

AM 122 – Video Production Methods I (4 units)
Class hours: 2 lecture, 2 laboratory.
ENG (Electronic News Gathering) style digital video production methods using portable cameras, basic field lighting techniques and audio recording. Students learn the pre-production and post-production process of creating videos including the development of production outlines, scripts and editing to create an original short video. Emphasis is placed on technical proficiency with basic portable video equipment. $50 technology fee required.

AM 204 – Website Design I (4 units)
Class hours: 2 lecture, 2 laboratory.
Introduces students to Adobe Dreamweaver to create basic Web page layouts. Students learn the basics of HTML, CSS and Adobe Photoshop to prepare photography and create graphics for Websites. Emphasis is placed on technical proficiency, content development and design style. Basic Internet vocabulary and industry standards are covered. $50 technology fee required.

AM 214 – Website Design II (4 units)
Prerequisite: AM 204;
Class hours: 2 lecture, 2 laboratory.
Studio course covers intermediate through advanced design and production methods for developing and publishing CSS Websites with Adobe Dreamweaver software. Students generate custom CSS code for Website and incorporate dynamic media into Web pages. Students learn how to generate dynamic content for Web pages with XML and acquire basic PHP scripting skills. Website promotion and SEO will also be explored. $50 technology fee required.

BUS 388 – Applied Statistical Methods (4 units)
Prerequisite: MTH 270
This course is designed to go beyond the topics covered in a one-term introductory statistics course. These new topics include: Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and special topics in regression analysis. The course will also investigate sets of data called time series, which consist of values corresponding to different time intervals. A major objective of this segment is to examine past time series data and use our observations to forecast, or predict future values. In addition, students will use Microsoft Excel and IBM SPSS Statistics to learn how to incorporate statistical results into sample reports as well as gain exposure to the field of data analytics and the analysis of large complex datasets.

BUS 550 – Marketing Strategy (3 units)
Prerequisite: Graduate or Senior standing.
This course covers fundamental marketing principles with a focus on effective marketing strategies in a digital era characterized by significant transformation from information technology. Markets of today require thinking globally but acting locally. They are also highly connected, participatory, and green, tooled to empower individuals and turn individual actions into massive market forces. In a way, the course re-conceptualizes the role of traditional marketing principles to explain the 105 Course Listings & Descriptions modern marketing actions fueled by the globalization, advanced technology, far-reaching connectivity, and unprecedented social presence.

and

BUS 550L – Marketing Research and Analytics Lab (1 unit)
Prerequisite: Graduate or Senior standing.
This course takes an experiential learning approach to leveraging social networks, search engine marketing and social media platforms to promote an organization’s brand or objectives. Students will work with real-world tools, scenarios and data. The course helps prepare students for work in marketing, consulting, and brand management in both B2C and B2B commerce. Students interested in entrepreneurship will find the course useful, as new businesses often rely on digital marketing to promote their brand and connect with consumers and investors.

MCU BS CORE COMPETENCY REQUIREMENTS OUTSIDE OF MAJOR

ENG 112 – College Composition 1: Expository Writing (4 units)
Prerequisite – ENG 108, if required, with a C or higher
The course introduces students to the requirements of academic writing: the use of quotation, summary, paraphrase and to the conventions of documentation, using a variety of approaches, including enumeration, definition, comparison/contrast. Students are required to complete at least three major assignments, including a limited research paper or documented essay.

Or

ENG 112H – College Composition I: Expository WritingHonors (4) Prerequisite: Placement into ENG 112 and invitation into Honors program or MCU cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher. This honors course introduces students to the requirements of academic writing (quotation, paraphrase, summary) through a thematic approach that ties together all course assignments. Students will complete three formal essays, including a limited research paper, in addition to attending two theme-related field experiences.

 

ID 230 – Information Literacy (1 unit)
Learn to construct a research strategy and use research resources for academic and career endeavors. Examine information technology’s impact on the individual and society.

1 course from the following:

PHI 325 – Modern Catholic Philosophy (4 units) 

This course introduces students to key movements and figures in Catholic philosophy from the nineteenth century through the present day: Romanticism, Ontologism, Integralism, Voluntarism, Phenomenology, Existentialism, Thomism, Analytical Philosophy, and Postmodernism. A3, PS1

REL 102Roots of Western Religious Literature I (4 units)
The literature of ancient Hebrew civilization and of the early Christian movement, as preserved in the Bible, from a culture very different from our own. The course aims to capture a sense of what this literature meant to the people of its time by studying its historical, cultural and literary background. This provides depth and perspective for a student’s personal interpretation of the Bible.

REL 103Roots of Western Religious Literature II (4 units)
The literature of the early Christian movement, as preserved in the New Testament of the Bible, was produced in a culture very different from our own. The course aims at reading this literature through the eyes of key persons of that time. The student will thus obtain a fresh perspective that will provide context and enrichment for personal reading of scripture literature.

REL 112 – Theology of the Nicene Creed (4 units)
An introductory survey of traditional Christian belief as expressed in the Nicene Constantinopolitan Creed. (Replacing REL 110).

REL 120 – Introduction to Catholic Thought (4 units)
Students will examine various themes in Catholic theology and how they relate to perennial human questions and aspirations. Theology can be understood as reflection upon faith experience, which in turn leads to the formulation of structures of belief. Students will gain an appreciation of the Catholic understanding of the human person, approach to revelation and mystery, and contribution to moral reasoning. In this conversation with the Catholic tradition, students will explore their own approach to foundational spiritual and ethical questions.

REL 130 – World Religions (4 units)
Introduction to the history, literature and thought patterns of the major religions of the world.
Or
REL 130H – World Religions-Honors (4) Prerequisite: Invitation into Honors program or MCU cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher. Introduction to the history, literature and thought patterns of the major religions of the world. Students will examine the nature, origin, function, and experience of religion through a research project that profiles the lived experience of a religious community of their choosing in the greater Los Angeles region. At least one field trip to a religious site will occur during the semester.

REL 230 – Catholic History & Thought (4 units)
Survey covering Catholic history, with a focus on thought, doctrine, ritual, and other aspects to provide students with a basic knowledge of the Church, its origins, development, and contemporary situation in a global context.

REL 310 – Catholic Social Teaching (4 units)
Studies the complex social problems facing the modern world by investigating the ways the Catholic Church, Catholic thinkers and activists have applied Christian principles to social issues, with special emphasis on official church documents since Leo XIII’s Rerum Novarum (1891). Students are not required to accept Catholic social teaching, but to enter into dialogue with it. PS1

1 course with a SCI prefix (Other than 136, 321, 342, 443, 497, 498 and 1-unit lab  

  classes) or BUS 301; CJ 200; ECO 400, 410; GEO 108; GS 220; ID 233H, 300H PSY 370, 445

 

SCI 100 – Introduction to Physical Science (4 units) This is a lecture and laboratory course. Interrelates the fundamental principles of chemistry and physics with emphasis on the experimental nature of science for the non-science major. $150.00 lab fee required. PS3

SCI 115 – Fundamentals of Chemistry (5 units) This is a lecture and laboratory course with a discussion section. The fundamental principles of chemistry are stressed, with emphasis on the chemistry of inorganic compounds. Includes the topics of atomic structure, chemical bonding, descriptive chemistry, stoichiometry, gas laws, solutions, equilibrium and redox. Recommended for students as a prerequisite for SCI 220, SCI 240, and/or SCI 116. $150.00 lab fee required. PS3

SCI 116 – Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry (4 units) Prerequisite: SCI 115. This is a lecture and laboratory course with a discussion section. A survey of organic and biochemistry. A study of the fundamental principles of organic chemistry, including molecular structure, properties and reactions of organic compounds and their role in human biochemistry. An introductory look at the structure and function of biological macromolecules. Recommended for students entering an allied health field. $150.00 lab fee required. PS3

SCI 120 – Physical Geology (4 units) This is a lecture and laboratory course. Composition and structure of the earth, the forces acting upon it and the resulting 140 surface features. Includes laboratory demonstrations and optional field trips. $150.00 lab fee required. PS3

SCI 130 – Biology of Animals (4 units) This is a lecture and laboratory course designed especially for the non-science major. Structure, function, development, evolution and overall diversity of animals. Interactions between animals and their environment. $150.00 lab fee required. PS3

SCI 132 – Human Anatomy (4 units) Recommended prerequisite: successful completion of high school or college biology. This is a lecture and laboratory course. An introduction to the structure of the human body at both the macroscopic and microscopic levels. Laboratory includes extensive dissection of preserved animals. $150.00 lab fee required. PS3

SCI 133 – Human Physiology (4 units) Recommended prerequisite: High school biology and chemistry with a grade of C or better, or their college equivalents. SCI 132 strongly Recommended. This is a lecture and laboratory course. An introduction to the function of the human body at the molecular, cellular and organ system levels of organization. No Lab fee for ’20-21. PS3

SCI 135 – Anatomy and Physiology (4 units) Recommended prerequisite: High school biology or chemistry or the equivalent. This is a lecture and laboratory course. Structure and function of the human body. Basic physical, chemical and biological principles necessary to understand the functioning of the organism as a whole and of the major systems. Recommended for psychology majors. $150.00 lab fee required. PS3

SCI 140 – Plants and Civilization (4 units) This is a lecture and laboratory course. This course is designed especially for the non-science major. Basic structure, physiology and evolution of the major plant groups and the roles of plants in the development of civilization and in modern society. $150.00 lab fee required. PS3

SCI 145 – Principles of Biology (4 units) This is a lecture and laboratory course. Major themes and unifying concepts of biology; physical/chemical basis of life; cellular biology; genetics and evolution. Surveys the biological kingdoms, including structure and function, evolution and diversity, behavior and ecology of representative groups. $150.00 lab fee required. PS3

SCI 150 – Microbiology (4 units) Prerequisite: High school biology or chemistry or equivalent. This is a lecture and laboratory course. This course studies the biology of living microorganisms, with emphasis on bacteria and their role in health and other human-related activities. Stresses disease-related microbes, with emphasis on laboratory skills in culturing, isolation and identification of selected, non-pathogenic bacteria. $150.00 lab fee required. PS3

SCI 155 – Introduction to Genetics (4 units) Principles of heredity with emphasis on humans. Includes the structure and function of genetic material, inherited diseases, the role of genes in cancer and current research in genetic engineering. This course is for the non-science major and has no college science prerequisite. PS3

SCI 160 – Marine Biology (4 units) This is a lecture and laboratory course. An introduction to the sea and its inhabitants. Includes study of the major marine ecosystems, with emphasis on the intertidal. Also considers the problems arising from man’s intervention in the natural marine systems. Laboratory emphasizes field studies, dissections and studies of live organisms. $150.00 lab fee required. PS3

SCI 170 – Ecology of Humans (4 units) This is a lecture and laboratory course. This is a study of the relationship between humans and the physical and biotic environment. The emphasis is directed toward the basic principles of ecology and evolution, the historical impact of humans on ecosystems and current environmental problems. No Lab fee for ’20-21. PS3

SCI 200 – General Physics I (4 units) Prerequisite: MTH 105. This is a lecture and laboratory course. This course covers kinematics, dynamics, statics, energy and momentum, rotation, and simple harmonic motion. No Lab fee for ’20-21. PS3

SCI 201 – General Physics II (4 units) Prerequisite: SCI 200. This is a lecture and laboratory course. This course covers fluids, relativity, wave motion (including sound and light), electricity and magnetism. No Lab fee for ’20-21. PS3

SCI 220 – General Chemistry I (5 units) Prerequisite: SCI 115, or passing grade on the chemistry proficiency exam. This is a lecture and laboratory course with a discussion section. General Chemistry for Science and Engineering majors with laboratory. This is the first semester of a two-term sequence. It covers fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include states of matter, measurement, atomic structure, quantum theory, periodicity, chemical reactions, molecular structure and chemical bonding, stoichiometry, gas laws and theories and solutions. The laboratory work emphasizes physical-chemical measurements, quantitative analysis and synthesis. $150.00 lab fee required. PS3

SCI 221 – General Chemistry II (5 units) Prerequisite: SCI 220. This is a lecture and
laboratory course with a discussion section. This course is the second course in the
two-term sequence for General Chemistry for Science Majors with Laboratory, 1
year. Topics include thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base theory, oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, descriptive chemistry of representative metallic and non-metallic elements, and an introduction to nuclear and organic chemistry. The laboratory work emphasizes physical-chemical measurements, quantitative analysis and synthesis. $150.00 lab fee required. PS3

SCI 224 – Introductory Astronomy (4 units) An introductory course designed to
introduce students to the basic concepts of astronomy, including cosmology,
cosmogony, elements of the solar system, stellar formation, galaxies and planetary
observation. PS3

SCI 230 – Physics I with Calculus (5 units) Prerequisite: MTH 130 or MTH 120. This is a lecture and laboratory course with a discussion section. This course is a calculus-based survey of kinematics, dynamics, statics, momentum, energy, rotation, gravitation and planetary motion. In addition, the course covers elasticity and vibration, wave motion, interference and standing waves, sound, the kinetic theory of gases, and thermodynamics. $150.00 lab fee required. PS3

SCI 231 – Physics II with Calculus (5 units) Prerequisite: SCI 230. Recommended preparation: MTH 131 and MTH 132. This is a lecture and laboratory course with a discussion section. This course is a calculus-based survey of electricity, magnetism, light, geometric and physical optics, special relativity, atomic and nuclear physics. $150.00 lab fee required. PS3

SCI 233 – The Science of Human Performance (4 units) Prerequisite: one course from SCI 130, 132, 133, 135, 145, 150, 155, 160, 240, 241, 242 or 246. Principles of physiology and nutrition as they relate to physical activity and human performance. The course offers an overview of the study of kinesiology-the study of human movement. The course is for students who want a better understanding of the positive effects of physical activity and nutrition on health, exercise performance and longevity. PS3

SCI 240 – General Biology I (4 units) Prerequisite: SCI 115 or 220. This is a lecture and laboratory course. This is the first of the three-course sequence designed for Biology majors. It provides a foundation in the principles of scientific inquiry and research, as well as to introduce to the structure and functions of a cell, as the basic unit of life. It describes cellular energy transformations and the process of growth including mitosis, meiosis and life cycles. In addition, laboratory sessions encourage the development of data collection and graphing skills and require scientific analysis and interpretation of data. The nature of scientific though and current progress in biology are discussed. No Lab fee for ’20-21.  PS3

SCI 241 – General Biology II (4 units) Prerequisite: SCI 240. This is a lecture and laboratory course. This is the second of the three-course sequence designed for Biology majors. It provides a foundation in the principles of genetics, evolution and ecology. Topics include the structure, function and transmission of genes from the perspectives of classical genetics and molecular biology, evolution and the interactions between organisms and their environment. In the laboratory sessions, students perform experiments that require data analysis and systematization. No Lab fee for ’20-21. PS3

SCI 242 – General Biology III (4 units) Prerequisite: SCI 241. This is a lecture and laboratory course. This is the third of the three-course lecture and laboratory sequence designed for Biology majors. Biodiversity of organisms is explored and their systems examined at and above the cellular level with plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates receiving equal attention. Topics include systematics, morphology, physiology, evolution and behavior. In addition, laboratory work included openinquiry investigations and library research. No Lab fee for ’20-21. PS3

SCI 246 – Nutrition (4 units) A comprehensive study of the biology of metabolism and nutrition, the pathology that results from poor nutrition, and the medical application of nutrition from neo-natal, pediatric, teen and adult perspectives. Students will gain knowledge of the psycho-social ramifications of nutrition in the current populace with special emphasis on alcohol disordered eating and diabetes. PS3

SCI 315 – Organic Chemistry I (5 units) Prerequisite: SCI 221. This is a lecture and laboratory course. The first of the two-course Organic Chemistry sequence. Topics include an introduction to Organic Chemistry to include structure, reactions, mechanism, and analysis of major functional groups of organic chemistry. Discussion will include ionic and radical reactions. $150.00 lab fee required. A3, PS3

SCI 316 – Organic Chemistry II (5 units) Prerequisite: SCI 315. This is a lecture and laboratory course. The second of the two-course Organic Chemistry sequence. Topics include structure and reactions of alcohols, carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, amines, aromatic compounds, heterocycles, sugars and amino acids. $150.00 lab fee required. A3, R2, R3, PS3

SCI 320 – Biochemistry (4 units) Prerequisites: SCI 316. Lecture 4 hours per week. This course is a survey of biochemistry covering intermediary metabolism and compounds of biochemical interest. The focus is on the application of biochemicals, catabolic pathways and regulation, and the biochemical foundations of life. Topics covered include:biochemical bonds and reactions, enzyme kinetics, amino acids, proteins, lipids and carbohydrates. Metabolism and regulatory pathways: glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, pentose phosphate, citric acid cycle, degradation and biosynthesis of lipid glycogen synthesis and degradation, oxidative phosphorylation.
PS3

SCI 330 – Biology of Microorganisms (4 units) Prerequisite: SCI 241. This is a lecture and laboratory course. This course covers microbial biology, biochemistry and genetics; ultrastructure and morphology, energy metabolism, physiology of bacterial growth, regulatory mechanisms, action of chemotherapeutic agents, and studies of clinical viruses, mycology and parasitology. The course covers the core concepts of microorganisms, emerging diseases, and the cutting-edge discoveries.  No Lab fee for ’20-21. R2, PS3

SCI 333 – Exercise Physiology (4 units) Prerequisite: SCI 233. Exercise physiology is the study of how the human body functions during exercise. The purpose of this lecture course is to increase understanding of acute and chronic physiological response to exercise. Regulation of metabolic pathways and endocrinology in health and metabolic diseases are also discussed. This is critical for a physical educator, athletic trainer, fitness coach, and/or exercise physiologist. PS3

SCI 334 – Ergogenic Aids in Sports (4 units)  The purpose of this course is to increase understanding of commonly known nutritional supplements, drugs, and ergogenic aids used to enhance athletic performance. Coffee, drugs, and anabolic steroids are all examples of ergogenic aids. The risks and benefits associated with the use of ergogenic aids in sport performance and weight and fat loss will also be discussed as well as principles and policies of doping control. PS3

SCI 340 – Cell Biology (4 units) Prerequisite: SCI 241 and SCI 316. An introduction to the principles that guide cellular organization and function. An emphasis on modern genetic, genomic, proteomic approaches to cell biology. The course will include a study of the cell cycle through apoptosis, modern genetic and molecular technologies. This will include nanotechnology, bioluminescence, X-ray crystallographic data, and genetic engineering. PS3

SCI 341 – Techniques in Biology Laboratory (2 units) Prerequisites: SCI 115, or passing grade on the chemistry proficiency exam, and SCI 240. This course is a study of basic laboratory techniques. It is designed to prepare the undergraduate students to gain an understanding of basic biological principles and to receive hands-on laboratory experience. Laboratory techniques include: skills for laboratory safety; operating laboratory instruments; how to keep a detailed lab notebook; familiarity with written protocols and standard laboratory procedures; handling pH meters, analytical scales, spectrophotometers, electrophoresis apparatus; preparation of solutions and dilutions, DNA, RNA and protein isolation and analysis; gel electrophoresis; aseptic techniques; use of light microscope; polymerase chain reaction. No Lab fee for ’20-21. PS3

SCI 350 – Genomics (4 units) Prerequisite: SCI 241. Genomics covers both core concepts of genetics and cutting-edge discoveries. It will integrate formal genetics (rules by which genes are transmitted), molecular genetics (the structure of DNA and how it direct the structure of proteins), systems biology (analysis of the gene set and its expression), and human genetics (how genes contribute to health and disease). PS3

SCI 380 – Molecular Biology (5 units) Prerequisite: SCI 241 and SCI 316. This is a lecture and laboratory course. Molecular Biology provides the chemical principles that determine the structure and function of macromolecules. The course will include the organization of the genetic material (DNA and RNA), and the maintenance of the genomes in chromosomes through DNA replication recombination and repair. The course will cover the techniques of molecular biology, genomic, proteomics, and bioinformatics. No Lab fee for ’20-21. R2, R3, PS3

SCI 440 – Immunology (4 units) Prerequisite: SCI 241. Immunology is the study of how the immune system works in both health and disease. This course focuses on understanding the mechanics of the immune response and also varied disease states which occur when the immune system is compromised. Genetics and clinical disease states are also discussed. PS3

SCI 442 – Developmental Biology (4 units) Prerequisite: SCI 241. Recommended preparation: SCI 340. The underlying principles and mechanisms regulating development in multicellular animals are covered. Differentiation, growth, morphogenesis, and patterning will be examined at the organismal, cellular, and molecular levels to provide a balanced view of developmental phenomena in key model organisms. PS3

 

BUS 301 – Management for Sustainability (4 units)  The course examines what we mean by sustainability, how businesses as agents of change can integrate sustainability into strategic planning, and how they can recognize opportunity and build success by doing so. Topics include organizational culture and incentives, systems thinking, sustainable strategies and policy, innovation, efficiency, stakeholder engagement, partnerships, cradle to cradle design, product development, product life cycle assessment, environmental accounting, product declarations, management metrics, sustainability targets, training, and promotion. The class works collaboratively on a case study that benefits a local project or organization. R3, PS3

CJ 200 – The Fundamentals of Forensic Science Investigations (4 units) This course studies the fundamentals and applications of the forensic sciences. This crime scene management course will survey fundamental topics in biology and chemistry that are relevant to forensic science. Topics include Management of Crime Scenes, Medicolegal Death Investigation, Crime Scene Reconstruction, Biological samples, DNA, PCR, Genetics, Proteins and Enzymes, Cellular Biology, Structure and Reactivity of Chemical Compounds, and Ethics and Forensic Science. This course is designed for forensic investigators, police officers, private or public investigators, or other students or professionals with an interest in forensic investigation. No Lab fee for ’20-21.  PS3

ECO 400 – People, Profit, Planet (4 units) Prerequisite: Upper division standing. An interdisciplinary approach to the challenges of meeting human needs in a socially responsible and environmentally sustainable manner. The course expands on classical economic models by integrating consideration of a triple bottom line of profitability, social equity, and physical sustainability in the broader context of resources, systems, and values. PS2, PS3

ECO 410 – Resource Economics (4 units) Prerequisite: upper division standing. This course explores historical analysis of population economics and resource management. It will examine aspects of local, national and global markets for resources and the implications for future resource policy. Private-sector and public sector solutions will be debated. Particular emphasis may be placed on timely topics such as the demand and supply of water and various energy sources. PS2, PS3

GEO 108 – Physical Geography (4 units) Physical Geography is the study of planet Earth as a system of interrelated parts, exploring its major subsystems – land, water and air – and their interactions. Topics include weather and climate, the hydrologic cycle, land forms, soils, and vegetation. PS3

GS 220 – Introduction to Sustainability (4 units) Recommended preparation:  prior college science course. A survey of the theory and practice of sustainability, addressing human impacts on Earth’s natural and human resources through resource consumption, waste and pollution. Coverage includes philosophical rationales, scientific underpinnings, and applied measures to reduce unsustainable practices in business operations, public administration, household management, and other enterprises. PS3

PSY 370 – Psychology of Health and Wellness (4 units) Prerequisite: PSY 150. This course will explore the contributions of psychology to our understanding of health and illness. We will explore the relationship between psychological factors and the development of illnesses; the role that social, emotional, and behavioral factors play in the prevention of illness and the maintenance of a healthy lifestyle; and we will examine how psychologists can assist in the management of chronic and terminal illnesses. We will also take a critical look at the current state of our healthcare system. PS3

PSY 445 – Physiological Psychology (4 units)  Prerequisite: PSY 150 and PSY 240. Study of the neurological and physiological foundations of behavior. Includes an introduction to functional neuroanatomy, as well as detailed study of the physiological bases of sensation, perception, emotion, motivation, learning, and higher mental functions. (Formerly PSY 335) PS3

1 course from Arts & Media (AM exclusions: 107, 207, 307, 407, 450, 497, 498, Internship, and Practicum courses)

Or

Music or Theology

BUS 315 – Principles of Entrepreneurship (4 units)
Recommended pre- or corequisite: BUS 300.
The course will set the framework for the principles and practices necessary for the formation and development of a new enterprise. In addition, students will learn what investors look for when assessing a business opportunity.

BUS 316 – Entrepreneurship II (4 units)
Prerequisite: ACCT 151, BUS 315.
A project-based course that will emphasize the hands-on business practices which are the major components of a full-cycle development of an idea into a successful enterprise. Students will refine their entrepreneurial skills and develop a business plan.

BUS 415 – Entrepreneurship for Social Change (4 units)
Social entrepreneurship is an emerging field which asserts that the problems of the world cannot be solved by governments or economic markets. To make real changes, entrepreneurs must act as stewards of their communities and undertake ventures which add social value. This interdisciplinary course is targeted to those students who believe they may seriously consider a social entrepreneurial opportunity early in their careers, although the skills developed will benefit any career direction. This course will include a field project with significant social service value-added.

BUS 454 – New Product Development (4 units)
Prerequisite: BUS 350.
This course will use readings, case analysis and projects to examine the processes, tools, and best practices used in developing new products and services. Topics include concept identification, market feasibility, technical feasibility, financial feasibility, new product adoption, and life-cycle management.

ENG 120 – Introduction to Literature (4 units)
Prerequisite: ENG 112.
A survey of literature by genre and/or chronology with the principal emphasis on representative works from English and American literature. Short stories, poetry, and at least one play and one novel are studied in critical detail.

ENG 125 – Literature and Film (4 units)
Prerequisite: ENG 112.
This course applies the principles of literary criticism and aesthetic analysis to the study of film and literature. Topics include the function of narrative in film, the relationship between the verbal and the visual image, and film as an effective medium for literary themes.

ENG 140 – Introduction to Drama (4 units)
Prerequisite: ENG 112.
A survey of dramatic works from the perspective of literature. Various types and forms of the drama as well as the artistic concerns of the dramatist are examined through selections from the history of the theatre.

ENG 310 – American Catholic Writers (4) Prerequisites: ENG 112, a lower division religion course, and a lower division literature course. This course examines American Catholic writers of the 20th Century, with an emphasis on Fiction, Drama, and Film. Students will learn how the author’s Catholic beliefs influence the characters, themes, and situations of the literary work, and understand how belief systems give unique perspectives on various aspects of American culture and society.

ID 111 – Immersive Reality for Interdisciplinary Applications and Enterprise (4 units)

An introductory course in reactive technology.  Immersive technology such as Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) is now a mainstream phenomenon used in many industries including, film, media, science, computer science, games, criminal justice, psychology, business and enterprise. In this course students from across the university will learn an overview of the field of virtual reality, and substantive training in the appropriate tools. Students will work in teams to learn about immersive technology for real-world international application, use immersive VR simulations relevant to their respective fields. R2, PS4

ID 200H – Artificial Intelligence: Computational Creativity and Empathy-Honors (4 units) Prerequisite: Invitation into Honors program or MCU cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher. This interdisciplinary course explores history, representation and utilization of artificial intelligence in various forms of cultural productions including literature, film, art, music and video games. Students learn the ethical issues associated with the use of artificial intelligence in cultural productions and its impact on how we see and understand our world. PS4, PS5

ID 430H – Perspectives on Leadership through Film and Theater-Honors (4 units) Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing or higher and invitation into Honors program or MCU cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher. The course offers students opportunities to discuss and reflect on leadership attributes and challenges through the ages as portrayed through film and theater. Includes a practice-based research project. R3, PS4, PS5

UNIT TOTALS

Any college level course listed in the Catalog or accepted as transfer credit may be taken as an elective to fulfill the 120 unit degree requirement in this BS program.

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