Minors

Expand your career path

A minor is a great way to add training in another discipline.  Explore your interests and beef up the degree you earn. An extra six classes can give you skills outside your major and a leg up in your job search. 

Complete 24 units

REQUIRED

ACCT 151 – Financial Accounting (4 units)
Offered every fall & spring
Introduction to financial accounting of the corporate entity, including generally accepted accounting principles underlying the analyzing and recording of transactions for preparation of the financial statements. Focus on understanding assets, liabilities, and equity accounts, as well as understanding internal control and the Sarbanes Oxley Act (2002) regulatory requirements. Introduction to financial statement analytical methods to assess the liquidity, solvency, and profitability of a business.

ACCT 201 – Managerial Accounting (4 units)
Offered every fall & spring
Prerequisite: ACCT 151
Introduction to managerial accounting. Managerial accounting topics and concepts, cost-volume-profit analysis, contribution margin, capital budgeting, flexible budgets and profit planning, standard costs and variance analysis, decision making, responsibility accounting, job order costing and process costing.

ACCT 340 – Accounting Information Systems (4 units)
Offered every fall
Prerequisite: ACCT 151
Students will explore topics in AIS to understand and use technologies in making decisions in areas of the accounting profession, such as managerial accounting, financial accounting, auditing, and tax accounting. An introduction to the information systems used in accounting including: the flow of data from source documents through the accounting cycle into reports for decision makers, the use of enterprise resource planning software (ERP), the principle of internal control, flowcharting and systems narratives and the use of database systems in accounting. Additionally, students will gain experience in Microsoft Excel as well as integrated software designed to handle general ledger, accounts payable, accounts receivable, financial statement analysis, fixed assets, sales order processing, inventory, and payroll.

ACCT 453 – Auditing (4 units)
Offered spring 2020, 2022, 2024
Prerequisite: ACCT 351 & 352
This course focuses on the contemporary auditing environment, the auditing profession, and the principles and practices of financial statement auditing. Topics include auditing, attestation and assurance services, Generally Accepted Auditing Standards (GAAS), regulatory requirements, internal controls, and audit risk. Audit planning is also covered including procedures, evidence and documentation. Students will research changes in the accounting and auditing profession due to legislation, new pronouncements by regulatory and standard-setting bodies and forces of current events in the business world. Students will also develop an understanding of the auditor’s ethical considerations. The course will culminate in an audit project including a report either with and existing organization or with financial information provided by the instructor.

AND 8 UNITS FROM:

ACCT 351 – Intermediate Accounting I (4 units)
Offered every fall
Prerequisite: ACCT 201
This course provides students with a comprehensive examination of financial accounting and reporting. Topics include conceptual framework, preparation and presentation of financial statements, revenue recognition, percentage of completion and comprehensive income, recording and reporting of cash, receivables and inventory valuation issues, plant assets, intangible assets, current liabilities and contingent liabilities.

ACCT 252 – Intermediate Accounting II (4 units)
Offered every spring
Prerequisite: ACCT 351
This course is the second of the two-course intermediate accounting sequence. Topics include long-term liabilities including bonds valuation, off-balance sheet financing, construction contracts, leases, pensions/post-retirement benefits issues and reporting, deferred income taxes, stockholders’ equity including complex capital structures, dilutive securities and earnings per share, investments equity and fair value accounting, and the preparation of statements of cash flow. Students will also become familiar with reporting requirements including: disclosure requirements, interim reporting requirements, projections and pro-forma financial statements.

ACCT 353 – Federal Income Taxation I (4 units)
Offered every fall
Prerequisite: ACCT 201
This course focuses on federal income taxation as it is applied to individuals, sole proprietorships, partnerships and corporations. Topics include: determination of basis regarding the formation of corporations and partnerships, the federal income taxation of corporations, the taxation of estates, gifts and trusts, corporate tax returns as well as tax issues involving S-corporations. Gain or loss rules regarding distributions, sale of interest and dissolution are also covered.

ACCT 391/491 – Accounting Internship (4 units)
Offered every fall & spring
Intended for students who want to participate in supervised, off-campus, practical experience. An internship is a partnership between the student, Marymount and a company/organization. The student will work closely with an MCU Instructor of Record and the Internship and Career Planning Office to develop appropriate learning outcomes and to identify an organization/company offering a comprehensive experience focused on a specific area of interest in a structured work environment under the supervision of an on-site supervisor and an MCU Instructor of Record.

BUS 380 – Corporate Finance (4 units)
Offered every fall and spring
Prerequisites: ACCT 151 and MTH 270. Familiarity with Excel is recommended.
This course introduces concepts and techniques of financial analysis with emphasis on corporate finance, although the financial principles explored in the course are useful for small business and personal financial decisions. Topics include financial statement analysis, corporate valuation, the time value of money and net present value, capital structure, and project analysis. These techniques can be applied to financial management in both the profit and non-profit sectors.

View accounting minor courses checklist

Complete 24 units

REQUIRED

AM 120 – Digital Foundations (4 units)
Offered every fall and spring
Class hours: 2 lecture, 2 laboratory
A digital design class, which explores elements and principles of art and design using media disciplines: video, animation, graphic design, website design, and ethics of art production. $50 technology fee required (for DCM majors only)

AND ONE THEORY CLASS FROM:

AM 101 – Western Civilization Art to the Renaissance (4 units)
This history course surveys the painting, sculpture and architecture of Western civilization from prehistoric times to the Renaissance. Analysis, evaluation and the interpretation of major themes in the development of the visual arts in Western culture are explored.

AM 102 – History of Broadcast Media (4 units)
This course examines the history of radio and television in the 20th Century. The course explores the development of broadcast media technologies as well as the evolution of the content of these medium including the news, entertainment genres, sports and advertising.

AM 105 – Introduction to Arts & Media Methodology (4 units)
This class explores theories of arts and media. Topics will include film, animation, interactive media, graphic design and ethics in the arts. Students research and analyze these art forms through diverse verbal and written projects.

AM 112 – Introduction to Journalism (4 units)
This course introduces the student to the art of journalism. Students explore the different writing styles of radio, television and newspaper reporting. Students examine the social and political forces that shape the news and that have defined journalism during the 20th century. Students will also examine the legal and ethical issues related to the profession. Internet journalism and blogging are also discussed.

AM 201 – Western Civilization Art Since the Renaissance (4 units)
This history course surveys the painting, sculpture and architecture of Western civilization from the Renaissance through the 19th Century. The course explores the religious, philosophical, social and political ideas that have influenced artists and art movements throughout this period.

AM 211 – Asian Art & Architecture (4 units)
This history course surveys the painting, sculpture and architecture of non-Western cultures including China, Japan, India and Southeast Asia. The course explores how the ideals, values and religious beliefs of non-Western cultures have influenced the art and artists of Asia.

AM 221 – History of Graphic Design (4 units)
A history of typography, graphic design and illustration. Students will acquire foundational knowledge of the history of design beginning with the early forms of writing and graphic designs such as cuneiform and illuminated manuscripts. Examines how these early forms of design evolved over time into the various disciplines that have become the foundations for visual communications in contemporary times.

AM 301 – Contemporary Art (4 units)
This history course surveys the painting, sculpture and architecture of contemporary art from the 20th and 21st Centuries. Analysis, evaluation and the interpretation of major themes in the development of the visual arts in Western Culture are explored. The course explores the philosophical, social and political ideas that have influenced contemporary artists and art.

AM 305 – History of International Cinema (4 units)
Study of the cinematic styles and history of five major regions of the world: Europe, Russia, China, Japan and India. Modules of study will follow each of these geographical locations from the advent of motion pictures to their modern day states, students will learn about important and unique films and filmmakers from each culture.

AM 306 – History of Documentary Film (4 units)
Chronological history of documentary film from its origins in 1887 to the mass proliferation of social media documentarians of the present. This course will highlight important documentarians as well as touch on multiple genres of documentary film, from the traditional to the cutting edge. Students will learn about the various styles of documentary and the many storytelling techniques used throughout the art form.

AM 308 – History of Game Design and Animation (4 units)
This course surveys the history of game design and animation. Examines the historical and ongoing relationships between animation meant for cinema and animation meant for digital games. Course topics include creation, design, aesthetic, technology and evolution of animation and video games beginning in the twentieth century through current day. (Formerly AM 205)

ID 111 – Immersive Reality for Interdisciplinary Applications and Enterprise (4 units)
An introductory course in reactive technology. Immersive technology such as virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) is now a mainstream phenomenon used in many industries including, film, media, science, computer science, games, criminal justice, psychology, business and enterprise. In this course students from across the university will learn an overview of the field of virtual reality, and substantive training in the appropriate tools. Students will work in teams to learn about immersive technology for real-world use.

ID 200H – Artificial Intelligence: Computational Creativity and Empathy – Honors (4 units) Prerequisite: Invitation into Honors program or MCU cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher.
This interdisciplinary course explores history, representation and utilization of artificial intelligence in various forms of cultural productions including literature, film, art, music and video games. Students learn the ethical issues associated with the use of artificial intelligence in cultural productions and its impact on how we see and understand our world.

16 UNITS (4 UNITS MINIMUM UPPER DIVISION) FROM:
Arts & media, theater, interdisciplinary studies – See catalog for class options.

View arts minor courses checklist

Complete 25 units

REQUIRED

SCI 115 – Fundamentals of Chemistry (5 units)
This is a lecture and laboratory course with a discussion section. The fundamental principles of chemistry are stressed, with emphasis on the chemistry of inorganic compounds. Includes the topics of atomic structure, chemical bonding, descriptive chemistry, stoichiometry, gas laws, solutions, equilibrium and redox. Recommended for students as a prerequisite for SCI 220, SCI 240, and/or SCI 116. $150 lab fee required.

or

SCI 220 – General Chemistry I (5 units)
This is a lecture and laboratory course with a discussion section. General chemistry for science and engineering majors with laboratory. This is the first semester of two-term sequence. It covers fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include states of matter, measurement, atomic structure, quantum theory, periodicity, chemical reactions, molecular structure and chemical bonding, stoichiometry, gas laws and theories and solutions. The laboratory work emphasizes physical-chemical measurements, quantitative analysis and synthesis. $150 lab fee required.

SCI 240 – General Biology (4 units)
Offered every fall
Prerequisite: SCI 115 or 220 or passing score on the chemistry proficiency exam.
This is a lecture and laboratory course. This is the first of the three-course sequence designed for biology majors. It provides a foundation in the principles of scientific inquiry and research, as well as to introduce to the structure and functions of a cell, as the basic unit of life. It describes cellular energy transformations and the process of growth including mitosis, meiosis and life cycles. In addition, laboratory sessions encourage the development of data collection and graphing skills and require scientific analysis and interpretation of data. The nature of scientific though and current progress in biology are discussed. 

SCI 241 – General Biology II (4 units)
Offered every spring
Prerequisite: SCI 240.
This is a lecture and laboratory course. This is the second of the three-course sequence designed for biology majors. It provides a foundation in the principles of genetics, evolution and ecology. Topics include the structure, function and transmission of genes from the perspectives of classical genetics and molecular biology, evolution and the interactions between organisms and their environment. In the laboratory sessions, students perform experiments that require data analysis and systematization.

SCI 242 – General Biology III – (4 units)
Offered every fall
Prerequisite: SCI 241.
This is a lecture and laboratory course. This is the third of the three-course lecture and laboratory sequence designed for biology majors. Biodiversity of organisms is explored and their systems examined at and above the cellular level with plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates receiving equal attention. Topics include systematics, morphology, physiology, evolution and behavior. In addition, laboratory work included open-inquiry investigations and library research.

ELECTIVES

8 units (4 units minimum upper division) from:

SCI 130 – Biology of Animals (4 units)
This is a lecture and laboratory course designed especially for the non-science major. Structure, function, development, evolution and overall diversity of animals. Interactions between animals and their environment. $150 lab fee required.

SCI 132 – Human Anatomy (4 units)
Recommended prerequisite: successful completion of high school or college biology. This is a lecture and laboratory course.
An introduction to the structure of the human body at both the macroscopic and microscopic levels. Laboratory includes extensive dissection of preserved animals.

SCI 133 – Human Physiology (4 units)
Recommended prerequisite: High school biology and chemistry with a grade of C or better, or their college equivalents.
SCI 132 strongly recommended.
This is a lecture and laboratory course. An introduction to the function of the human body at the molecular, cellular and organ system levels of organization.

SCI 136 – Medical Terminology (1 unit)
Recommended prerequisite: a life science course.
This course provides an introduction to medical terminology/vocabulary 144 commonly used in the medical field. Throughout the duration of the course students will learn the concept of “medical word building,” word origins and how to effectively analyze word roots, prefixes, and suffixes.

SCI 150* – Microbiology (4 units)
Prerequisite: High school biology or chemistry or equivalent. This is a lecture and laboratory course.
This course studies the biology of living microorganisms, with emphasis on bacteria and their role in health and other human-related activities. Stresses disease-related microbes, with emphasis on laboratory skills in culturing, isolation and identification of selected, non-pathogenic bacteria. $150 lab fee required.

SCI 155** – Introduction to Genetics (4 units)
Principles of heredity with emphasis on humans. Includes the structure and function of genetic material, inherited diseases, the role of genes in cancer and current research in genetic engineering. This course is for the non-science major and has no college science prerequisite.

SCI 160 – Marine Biology (4 units)
This is a lecture and laboratory course. An introduction to the sea and its inhabitants. Includes study of the major marine ecosystems, with emphasis on the intertidal. Also considers the problems arising from man’s intervention in the natural marine systems. Laboratory emphasizes field studies, dissections and studies of live organisms. $150 lab fee required.

SCI 170 – Ecology of Humans (4 units)
This is a lecture and laboratory course. This is a study of the relationship between humans and the physical and biotic environment. The emphasis is directed toward the basic principles of ecology and evolution, the historical impact of humans on ecosystems and current environmental problems.

SCI 233 – The Science of Human Performance (4 units)
Prerequisite: one course from SCI 130, 132, 133, 135, 145, 150, 155, 160, 240, 241, 242 or 246. Principles of physiology and nutrition as they relate to physical activity and human performance. The course offers an overview of the study of kinesiology-the study of human movement. The course is for students who want a better understanding of the 146 positive effects of physical activity and nutrition on health, exercise performance and longevity.

SCI 246 – Nutrition (4 units)
A comprehensive study of the biology of metabolism and nutrition, the pathology that results from poor nutrition, and the medical application of nutrition from neo-natal, pediatric, teen and adult perspectives. Students will gain knowledge of the psycho-social ramifications of nutrition in the current populace with special emphasis on alcohol disordered eating and diabetes.

SCI 320 – Biochemistry (4 units)
Prerequisite: SCI 316. Lecture 4 hours per week. This course is a survey of biochemistry covering intermediary metabolism and compounds of biochemical interest. The focus is on the application of biochemicals, catabolic pathways and regulation, and the biochemical foundations of life. Topics covered include biochemical bonds and reactions, enzyme kinetics, amino acids, proteins, lipids and carbohydrates. Metabolism and regulatory pathways: glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, pentose phosphate, citric acid cycle, degradation and biosynthesis of lipid glycogen synthesis and degradation, oxidative phosphorylation.

SCI 330* – Biology of Microorganisms (4 units)
Prerequisite: SCI 241.
This is a lecture and laboratory course. This course covers microbial biology, biochemistry and genetics; ultrastructure and morphology, energy metabolism, physiology of bacterial growth, regulatory mechanisms, action of chemotherapeutic agents, and studies of clinical viruses, mycology and parasitology. The course covers the core concepts of microorganisms, emerging diseases and cutting-edge discoveries.

SCI 333 – Exercise Physiology (4 units)
Prerequisite: SCI 233 or 241.
Exercise physiology is the study of how the human body functions during exercise. The purpose of this lecture course is to increase understanding of acute and chronic physiological response to exercise. Regulation of metabolic pathways and endocrinology in health and metabolic diseases are also discussed.

SCI 340 – Cell Biology (4 units)
Prerequisite: SCI 241 and SCI 316.
An introduction to the principles that guide cellular organization and function. An emphasis on modern genetic, genomic, proteomic approaches to cell biology. The course will include a study of the cell cycle through apoptosis, modern genetic and molecular technologies. This will include nanotechnology, bioluminescence, X-ray crystallographic data and genetic engineering.

SCI 341 – Techniques in Biology Laboratory (2 units)
Prerequisite: SCI 241.
This course is a study of basic laboratory techniques. It is designed to prepare the undergraduate students to gain an understanding of basic biological principles and to receive hands-on laboratory experience. Laboratory techniques include: skills for laboratory safety; operating laboratory instruments; how to keep a detailed lab notebook; familiarity with written protocols and standard laboratory procedures; handling pH meters, analytical scales, spectrophotometers, electrophoresis apparatus; preparation of solutions and dilutions, DNA, RNA and protein isolation and analysis; gel electrophoresis; aseptic techniques; use of light microscope; polymerase chain reaction.

SCI 342 – Science Career Seminar (4 units)
Prerequisite: SCI 233 or 241 or 315.
The course will emphasize important issues in biology and increase awareness of the diversity of research topics. The course is designed to stimulate students’ interest in research, to develop and enhance their ability to think scientifically, to clearly present information orally and to summarize in written format the content of scientific journal. Students will be exposed to reports, readings and participate in discussions of materials relevant to biology field.

SCI 350** – Genomics (4 units)
Prerequisite: SCI 241.
Genomics covers both core concepts of genetics and cutting-edge discoveries. It will integrate formal genetics (rules by which genes are transmitted), molecular genetics (the structure of DNA and how it direct the structure of proteins), systems biology (analysis of the gene set and its expression), and human genetics (how genes contribute to health and disease).

SCI 380 – Molecular Biology (5 units)
Prerequisite: SCI 241 and SCI 316. This is a lecture and laboratory course.
Molecular biology provides the chemical principles that determine the structure and function of macromolecules. The course will include the organization of the genetic material (DNA and RNA), and the maintenance of the genomes in chromosomes through DNA replication recombination and repair. The course will cover the techniques of molecular biology, genomic, proteomics and bioinformatics.

SCI 440 – Immunology (4 units)
Prerequisite: SCI 241.
Immunology is the study of how the immune system works in both health and disease. This course focuses on understanding the mechanics of the immune response and also varied disease states which occur when the immune system is compromised. Genetics and clinical disease states are also discussed.

SCI 442 – Developmental Biology (4 units)
Prerequisite: SCI 241. Recommended preparation: SCI 340.
The underlying principles and mechanisms regulating development in multicellular animals are covered. Differentiation, growth, morphogenesis, and patterning will be examined at the organismal, cellular, and molecular levels to provide a balanced view of developmental phenomena in key model organisms.

NOTES:

If you are an MDS major with an emphasis is Human Performance, SCI 132, 133, 246 may not be used as electives in biology. Elective courses must be unique to each emphasis. For example, if SCI 130 is being used as a biology elective, it may not also be used as a human performance elective.

*SCI 150 and 330 may not both be used. Students must choose one to apply to degree if both have been taken.

**SCI 155 and 350 may not both be used. Students must choose one to apply to degree if both have been taken.

View biology minor courses checklist

Complete 24 units

REQUIRED

ACCT 151 – Financial Accounting (4 units)
Introduction to financial accounting of the corporate entity, including generally accepted accounting principles underlying the analyzing and recording of transactions for preparation of the financial statements. Focus on understanding assets, liabilities, and equity accounts, as well as understanding internal control and the Sarbanes Oxley Act (2002) regulatory requirements. Introduction to financial statement analytical methods to assess the liquidity, solvency, and profitability of a business.

BUS 110 – Introduction to Business (4 units)
The course examines the functions, objectives, organization and structure of business in a market economy and in a global context, including relationships among business, government, and the consumer. Course modules include business organization and management; pricing and distribution; human resources; accounting; financial management and investment; and the nature, causes and implications of international trade and multi-national business organizations.

ECO 220 – Microeconomics (4 units)
Essential principles of economic analysis from the viewpoint of choices to be made by individual economic units. Scarcity; supply, demand and elasticity; opportunity costs; cost theory; price and output determination under various market structures and factor markets; government regulation; comparative advantage; international trade. Application of economic theory to current economic problems.

ELECTIVES

12 Accounting, business or economics units (8 units minimum upper division or graduate). See catalog for class options.

View business minor courses checklist

SCI 220 – General Chemistry I (5 units)
This is a lecture and laboratory course with a discussion section.
General chemistry for science and engineering majors with laboratory. This is the first semester of a two-term sequence. It covers fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include states of matter, measurement, atomic structure, quantum theory, periodicity, chemical reactions, molecular structure and chemical bonding, stoichiometry, gas laws and theories and solutions. The laboratory work emphasizes physical-chemical measurements, quantitative analysis and synthesis. $150 lab fee required.

SCI 221 – General Chemistry II (5 units)
Prerequisite: SCI 220.
This is a lecture and laboratory course with a discussion section.
This course is the second course in the two-term sequence for general chemistry for science majors with laboratory (1 year). Topics include thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base theory, oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, descriptive chemistry of representative metallic and non-metallic elements, and an introduction to nuclear and organic chemistry. The laboratory work emphasizes physical-chemical measurements, quantitative analysis and synthesis.

SCI 315 – Organic Chemistry I (5 units)
Prerequisite: SCI 221.
This is a lecture and laboratory course. The first of the two-course organic chemistry sequence. Topics include an introduction to organic chemistry to include structure, reactions, mechanism, and analysis of major functional groups of organic chemistry. Discussion will include ionic and radical reactions. $150 lab fee required.

SCI 316 – Organic Chemistry II (5 units)
Prerequisite: SCI 315.
This is a lecture and laboratory course. The second of the two-course organic chemistry sequence. Topics include structure and reactions of alcohols, carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, amines, aromatic compounds, heterocycles, sugars and amino acids. $150 lab fee required.

SCI 320 – Biochemistry (4 units)
Prerequisites: SCI 316.
Lecture 4 hours per week.
This course is a survey of biochemistry covering intermediary metabolism and compounds of biochemical interest. The focus is on the application of biochemicals, catabolic pathways and regulation, and the biochemical foundations of life. Topics covered include biochemical bonds and reactions, enzyme kinetics, amino acids, proteins, lipids and carbohydrates. Metabolism and regulatory pathways: glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, pentose phosphate, citric acid cycle, degradation and biosynthesis of lipid glycogen synthesis and degradation, oxidative phosphorylation.

SCI 321 – Biochemistry Lab (2 units)
Prerequisite: SCI 320. This is a lecture and laboratory course. Biochemistry laboratory focuses on techniques used for preparation and quantitative analysis of macromolecules. The course addresses the current biochemical techniques used in research and in biotechnology laboratories. It covers micro pipetting, solution preparation, activity assays, homogenization, protein detection using Bradford and colorimetric assays, SDS-PAGE, Western Blot analysis, enzyme kinetics, lipids and carbohydrates detection.

View chemistry minor courses checklist

Complete 24 units

REQUIRED

CS 195 – Programming and Problem Solving (4 units)
Lecture and Laboratory. Prerequisites: prior experience with basic programming concepts recommended. Elements of good programming design, style, documentation and efficiency. Methods for debugging verification. Fundamental techniques for solving problems using C++ programming language. Principles and use of object-oriented programming, including overloading, data abstraction, templates, inheritance and polymorphism.

CS 196 – Introduction to Java Programming (4 units)
Prerequisite: prior experience with basic programming concepts recommended.
This course is an introduction to the Java programming language and the Object-Oriented Programming paradigm (OOP). Students will write programs to solve problems in business, mathematics and other subjects, working with character strings, arrays, functions and procedures. Java browser applets will also be covered

CS 210 – Introduction to C Programming Language (4 units)
Fundamentals of the C programming language and its application to problem solving. Topics include structured programming techniques, variable types, control statements, built-in and user-coded procedures and functions, arrays, pointers, full handling, and use of the C library.

Choose Game Design or Web Design 3-course sequence – 12 units

Game Design:

AM 203 – Digital 3d Modeling (4 units)
Class hours: 2 lecture, 2 laboratory.
Students will gain a basic proficiency in Autodesk Maya 3D. Emphasis will be placed on principles of 3d design techniques for illustration and animation. The Autodesk Maya relationship to peripheral software such as Adobe Photoshop and After Effects will also be explored. $50 technology fee required.

AM 310 – Digital Game Design I (4 units)
Class hours: 2 lecture, 2 laboratory.
Students will gain a basic proficiency in using a game engine to aid in computer game development. This course explores theoretical and practical topics of game design including game engine user interface, use of game objects and assets, managing projects and assets, preparing assets for implementation, assemblage of game level environment, audio, game play, game look-and-feel, and user psychology. $50 technology fee required.

AM 410 – Digital Game Design II (4 units)
Prerequisites: AM 303 & AM 310.
Class hours: 2 lecture, 2 laboratory.
Students will gain intermediate to advanced proficiency in using a game engine to aid in computer game design development. Advanced game design topics include multilevel game design, animating game objects in a game editor, bringing animations into a game, scripting in game development, creating particle systems, building the camera and player selection system, and designing user interfaces for games. $50 technology fee required.

Web Design

AM 104 – Introductory HTML & PHP (4 units)
Class hours: 2 lecture; 2 laboratory.
Students learn the basics of reading and writing HTML. Basic hand coding skills are acquired using Adobe Dreamweaver. Students will also learn introductory PHP scripting skills. Website administration methods and server technologies are also explored. $50 technology fee required.

AM 204 – Website Design I (4 units)
Class hours: 2 lecture, 2 laboratory.
Introduces students to Adobe Dreamweaver to create basic Web page layouts. Students learn the basics of HTML, CSS and Adobe Photoshop to prepare photography and create graphics for Websites. Emphasis is placed on technical proficiency, content development and design style. Basic Internet vocabulary and industry standards are covered. $50 technology fee required. R2, PS4

AM 334 – Website Technologies (4 units)
Prerequisite: AM 204;
Class hours: 2 lecture, 2 laboratory.
Advanced course covers various technologies for Website development. Students learn how to add sophisticated functionality to Websites with various coding and server technologies including PHP, JavaScript, MySQL, content management systems (CMS). Server administration and management is also covered. Emphasis is placed on technical proficiency. $50 technology fee required.

View computer science minor courses checklist

Complete 24 units

REQUIRED

CJ 101 – Introduction to Criminal Justice (4 units)
This course is a study of the history and philosophy of administration of justice in the United States. The course will include a survey of law enforcement, the judiciary, and corrections. Topics include crime theory, role expectations and their inter-relationships, punishment, rehabilitation, ethics, education, and training.

CJ 121 – Concepts of Criminal Law (4 units)
This course examines the historical development and philosophy of law, including the provisions as set forth in the U.S. Constitution, and its application to the criminal justice system. Topics covered in the course will include legal research, case law, crime classifications, crimes against persons, crimes against property, and crimes against the state.

CJ 301 – Strategic Communication: Literacy Skills for the Public Safety Professional (4 units)
Prerequisite: CJ 101
This course presents techniques for clearly communicating information during incidents, emergencies, or crisis situations. The course is primarily developed for the public sector for areas such as criminal justice, emergency management, fire service, Homeland Security and other fields. It focuses on developing the student’s ability to organize information and present it in written, oral, and presentation formats through research, development, writing, and public presentations. Emphasis is placed on applying writing and group presentation skills to professional activities in the public and private sectors.

ELECTIVES

12 criminal justice units (8 minimum upper division). See catalog for class options.

View criminal justice minor courses checklist

Complete 24 units

REQUIRED

AM 120 – Digital Foundations (4 units)
Class hours: 2 lecture, 2 laboratory
A digital design class, which explores elements and principles of art and design using media disciplines: video, animation, graphic design, website design, and ethics of art production. $50 technology fee required (for DCM majors only).

AM 122 – Video Production Methods I (4 units)
Class hours: 2 lecture, 2 laboratory
ENG (Electronic News Gathering) style digital video production methods using portable cameras, basic field lighting techniques and audio recording. Students learn the pre-production and post-production process of creating videos including the development of production outlines, scripts and editing to create an original short video. Emphasis is placed on technical proficiency with basic portable video equipment. $50 technology fee required.

OR

AM 204 – Website Design I (4 units)
Class hours: 2 lecture, 2 laboratory
Introduces students to Adobe Dreamweaver to create basic Web page layouts. Students learn the basics of HTML, CSS and Adobe Photoshop to prepare photography and create graphics for Websites. Emphasis is placed on technical proficiency, content development and design style. Basic Internet vocabulary and industry standards are covered. $50 technology fee required.

CAR 145 – Communication Structures (4 units)
An examination of the structures underlying both verbal and visual modes of communication in modern society. Emphasis is placed on a study of comparable features in the various media used in the art of expression. Contemporary media will be investigated against a background of standard patterns of communication. Written, oral, and digital communication skills will also be developed through a series of written research projects and recorded and/or live presentations.

ELECTIVES

12 arts and media or communication arts or interdisciplinary studies 111, 200H units (4 minimum upper division). See catalog for class options.

View digital communication minor courses checklist

Complete 24 units

REQUIRED

SCI 132 – Human Anatomy (4 units)
Recommended prerequisite: successful completion of high school or college biology. This is a lecture and laboratory course. An introduction to the structure of the human body at both the macroscopic and microscopic levels. Laboratory includes extensive dissection of preserved animals.

SCI 133 – Human Physiology (4 units)
Recommended prerequisite: High school biology and chemistry with a grade of C or better, or their college equivalents. SCI 132 strongly recommended.
This is a lecture and laboratory course. An introduction to the function of the human body at the molecular, cellular and organ system levels of organization.

SCI 233 – The Science of Human Performance (4 units)
Prerequisite: one course from SCI 130, 132, 133, 135, 145, 150, 155, 160, 240, 241, 242 or 246.
Principles of physiology and nutrition as they relate to physical activity and human performance. The course offers an overview of the study of kinesiology-the study of human movement. The course is for students who want a better understanding of the positive effects of physical activity and nutrition on health, exercise performance and longevity.

SCI 246 – Nutrition (4 units)
A comprehensive study of the biology of metabolism and nutrition, the pathology that results from poor nutrition, and the medical application of nutrition from neo-natal, pediatric, teen and adult perspectives. Students will gain knowledge of the psycho-social ramifications of nutrition in the current populace with special emphasis on alcohol disordered eating and diabetes.

SCI 333 – Exercise Physiology (4 units)
Prerequisite: SCI 233 or 241.
Exercise physiology is the study of how the human body functions during exercise. The purpose of this lecture course is to increase understanding of acute and chronic physiological response to exercise. Regulation of metabolic pathways and endocrinology in health and metabolic diseases are also discussed. This is critical for a physical educator, athletic trainer, fitness coach, and/or exercise physiologist.

SCI 334 – Ergogenic Aids in Sports (4 units)
The purpose of this course is to increase understanding of commonly known nutritional supplements, drugs, and ergogenic aids used to enhance athletic performance. Coffee, drugs, and anabolic steroids are all examples of ergogenic aids. The risks and benefits associated with the use of ergogenic aids in sport performance and weight and fat loss will also be discussed as well as principles and policies of doping control.

View human performance minor courses checklist

Complete 24 units

REQUIRED

PHI 100 – Contemporary Moral Issues (4 units)
A critical examination of controversial moral problems confronting contemporary society. Topics may include: abortion, capital punishment, environmental ethics, sexual morality, euthanasia, affluence and poverty, business ethics, censorship, gun control, discrimination, nuclear war, and genetic engineering.

OR

PHI 110 – Ethics (4 units)
Concerned with the justification for how/why we treat each other and the environment. The focus is on the question of the good life, the development of moral character, the relative merits of ethical principles, and the ethical assumptions of the student and of modern society.

OR

PHI 150 – Human Nature and Values (4 units)
The major ideologies and philosophies defining the meaning of human nature and their consequent values and philosophies of life: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism and Christianity; the teachings of Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Descartes, Darwin, Huxley, Marx, Freud, Skinner and Sartre; scientific reductionism; cybernetics.

PHI 120 – Introduction to Philosophy: History of Philosophy (4 units)
Selected major philosophies from the four great historical periods and their developmental influences into the 21st century. Ancient philosophy (Buddha, Confucius, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle); medieval philosophy (St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas); modern philosophy (Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant); contemporary philosophy (James, Ayer, Wittgenstein, Sartre, 20th Century Science).

PHI 130 – Logic – Critical Thinking (4 units)
A foundation course in formal and informal logic. Topics include the functions and forms of language, symbolizing ordinary language, deductive logic, inductive logic, informal fallacies, and the scientific method. Emphasis is on appreciating the value of sound/cogent reasoning and unambiguous communication.

PHI 145 – Philosophy of Religion (4 units)
A study of issues raised by religious faith: proofs for existence of God, the problem of evil, atheism, free will, existence/ immortality of the soul, and why there are so many religions.

ELECTIVES

8 units upper division philosophy or religious studies. See catalog for class options.

View philosophy minor courses checklist

Complete 24 units

REQUIRED

PSY 150 – General Psychology (4 units)
Survey of various fields within the discipline of psychology, such as perception, memory and personality, and how each of these fields contributes to understanding and improving human behavior.

PSY 235 – Stats for the Study of Behavior (4 units)
Application of descriptive and inferential statistical techniques for summarizing research data in the behavioral sciences; including levels of measurement, frequency distributions, central tendency, variability, normal distributions, central limit theorem, and applications of a variety of statistical tests. Data analysis technologies are used to develop digital literacy. Comparable to MTH 270. Credit will not be granted for both classes.

OR

MTH 270 – Introductory Statistics (4 units)
An introductory course in probability and statistics. It includes calculation and analysis of statistical parameters with statistical software for personal computers. Topics include sampling, measures of central tendency and variability, probability distribution, normal and binomial distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing. Application of a variety of statistical tests, including the sign test, z-test, t-test, chi-square analysis of variance, linear regression and correlation, and non-parametric tests. Comparable to PSY 235. Credit will not be given for both courses.

ELECTIVES

16 psychology units (8 units minimum upper division). See catalog for class options.

View psychology minor courses checklist

Additional information

  • Any area of emphasis defined in the multidisciplinary studies bachelor of arts program may be added to another bachelor’s degree as a minor.
  • The minor may not be the same discipline as the degree.
  • A minor added to the multidisciplinary studies bachelor of arts program requires completion of a third emphasis, since the multidisciplinary studies degree itself requires two emphases.
  • Courses may not be applied to more than one area of emphasis. Limitations are in place when more than one course is required/taken in both the major and minor. Examples are:
    • Accounting BS and business minor
    • Biology BA/BS and biology or chemistry minor
    • Business BA and business minor
    • Criminal justice BA and criminal justice minor
    • Digital communication media BS and digital communication minor
    • Management BS and business minor
    • Psychology BA and psychology minor